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[620c] After her, he said, he saw the soul of Epeius,1 the son of Panopeus, entering into the nature of an arts and crafts woman. Far off in the rear he saw the soul of the buffoon Thersites2 clothing itself in the body of an ape. And it fell out that the soul of Odysseus drew the last lot of all and came to make its choice, and, from memory of its former toils having flung away ambition, went about for a long time in quest of the life of an ordinary citizen who minded his own business,3 and with difficulty found it lying in some corner disregarded by the others,

1 Who built the Trojan horse. See Hesychius s.v.

2 Cf. Iliad ii. 212 ff.

3 For ἀπράγμονος cf. on 565 A, p. 316, note b.

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