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Chorus
[245] The time has come for each of us to veil his head and steal away on foot, or to sit and take on the swift yoke of rowing, [250] giving her way to the sea-faring ship. So angry are the threats which the brother-kings, the sons of Atreus, speed against us! I fear to share in bitter death beneath an onslaught of stones, [255] crushed at this man's side, whom an untouchable fate holds in its grasp.

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load focus Notes (Sir Richard C. Jebb, 1907)
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  • Commentary references to this page (2):
    • Sir Richard C. Jebb, Commentary on Sophocles: Antigone, 144
    • Sir Richard C. Jebb, Commentary on Sophocles: Antigone, 158
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