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Antigone
[823] I have heard with my own ears how our Phrygian guest, the daughter of Tantalus, perished [825] in so much suffering on steep Sipylus—how, like clinging ivy, the sprouting stone subdued her. And the rains, as men tell, do not leave her melting form, nor does the snow, [830] but beneath her weeping lids she dampens her collar. Most like hers is the god-sent fate that leads me to my rest.

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hide References (2 total)
  • Commentary references to this page (2):
    • Sir Richard C. Jebb, Commentary on Sophocles: Ajax, 1291
    • Sir Richard C. Jebb, Commentary on Sophocles: Ajax, 952
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