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Chorus
[1225] Not to be born is, beyond all estimation, best; but when a man has seen the light of day, this is next best by far, that with utmost speed he should go back from where he came. For when he has seen youth go by, with its easy merry-making, [1230] what hard affliction is foreign to him, what suffering does he not know? Envy, factions, strife, battles, [1235] and murders. Last of all falls to his lot old age, blamed, weak, unsociable, friendless, wherein dwells every misery among miseries.

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  • Commentary references to this page (5):
    • Sir Richard C. Jebb, Commentary on Sophocles: Oedipus at Colonus, 974
    • Sir Richard C. Jebb, Commentary on Sophocles: Antigone, 1025
    • Sir Richard C. Jebb, Commentary on Sophocles: Ajax, 477
    • W. W. How, J. Wells, A Commentary on Herodotus, 1.31
    • W. W. How, J. Wells, A Commentary on Herodotus, 5.4
  • Cross-references to this page (1):
    • Basil L. Gildersleeve, Syntax of Classical Greek, The Article
  • Cross-references in notes to this page (1):
  • Cross-references in general dictionaries to this page (3):
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