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Chorus
Never, old man, never will anyone remove you from your resting-place here against your will.

Oedipus begins to move forward.

Oedipus
Further, then?

Chorus
Come still further.

Oedipus
Further?

Chorus
[180] Lead him onward, maiden, for you hear us and obey.

Antigone
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Oedipus
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Antigone
Come, follow this way with your dark steps, father, as I lead you.

Oedipus
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Chorus
Stranger in a foreign land, [185] poor man, have the courage to detest what the city steadfastly holds as not dear, and to reverence what it holds dear!

Oedipus
Lead me, then, child, to a spot where I may speak and listen within piety's domain, [190] and let us not wage war with necessity.

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hide References (5 total)
  • Commentary references to this page (5):
    • Sir Richard C. Jebb, Commentary on Sophocles: Oedipus at Colonus, 175
    • Sir Richard C. Jebb, Commentary on Sophocles: Antigone, 1042
    • Sir Richard C. Jebb, Commentary on Sophocles: Electra, 1052
    • Sir Richard C. Jebb, Commentary on Sophocles: Philoctetes, 611
    • Sir Richard C. Jebb, Commentary on Sophocles: Trachiniae, 978
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