previous next

Oedipus
And where, strangers, is the lord of this realm?

Chorus
He is at the city of his fathers in our land. The messenger who sent us here has gone to fetch him.

Oedipus
Do you think that he will have any regard or care for the blind man, [300] so as to come here himself?

Chorus
Yes, surely, as soon as he learns of your name.

Oedipus
Who is there to bring him that word?

Chorus
The way is long, and many words from travellers often wander about. When he hears them, he will soon be with us, never fear. [305] For your name, old man, has been loudly trumpeted through all lands, so that even if he is taking his ease, and slow to move, when he hears of you he will swiftly arrive.

Oedipus
Well, may he come with good fortune both for his own city and for me! What noble man is not his own friend?

Antigone
[310] O Zeus! What shall I say? What shall I think, my father?

Oedipus
What is it, Antigone, my child?

Antigone
I see a woman coming towards us, mounted on a colt of Etna; she wears a Thessalian bonnet to screen her face from the sun. [315] What shall I say? Is it she, or is it not? Does my judgment err? Yes—no—I cannot tell—ah, me! It is no other, yes! She greets me with bright glances [320] as she draws near, and makes a signal. Here is Ismene, clearly, and no other before me.

Oedipus
What is that you say, my child?

Antigone
That I see your daughter, my sister. By her voice right away you can know her.

Ismene
Father and sister, names most sweet to me! How hard it was to find you! [325] And how hard now to look upon you for my tears!

Oedipus
My child, have you come?

Ismene
Father, your fate is sad to see!

Oedipus
Are you with us, my child?

Ismene
Not without toil, indeed, for myself.

Oedipus
Touch me, my daughter!

Ismene
I give a hand to each at once.

Oedipus
[330] Ah my children, my sisters!

Ismene
Alas, twice-wretched life!

Oedipus
Her life and mine?

Ismene
And mine, wretched me, makes a third.

Oedipus
Child, why have you come?

Ismene
Through concern for you, father.

Oedipus
Through longing to see me?

Ismene
Yes, and to bring you news by my own mouth, with the only faithful servant that I had.

Oedipus
[335] And where are the young men, your brothers, in our need?

Ismene
They are where they are; their circumstances now are terrible.

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 United States License.

An XML version of this text is available for download, with the additional restriction that you offer Perseus any modifications you make. Perseus provides credit for all accepted changes, storing new additions in a versioning system.

load focus Notes (Sir Richard C. Jebb, 1899)
hide Places (automatically extracted)

View a map of the most frequently mentioned places in this document.

Sort places alphabetically, as they appear on the page, by frequency
Click on a place to search for it in this document.
Aetna (Italy) (1)

Visualize the most frequently mentioned Pleiades ancient places in this text.

Download Pleiades ancient places geospacial dataset for this text.

hide References (4 total)
  • Commentary references to this page (2):
    • Sir Richard C. Jebb, Commentary on Sophocles: Oedipus at Colonus, 65
    • Sir Richard C. Jebb, Commentary on Sophocles: Electra, 312
  • Cross-references in general dictionaries to this page (2):
hide Display Preferences
Greek Display:
Arabic Display:
View by Default:
Browse Bar: