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Creon
[800] Which of us, do you think, suffers more in this exchange—I by your action, or you by your own?

Oedipus
For me, it is enough if your pleading fails both with me and with these men nearby.

Creon
Unhappy man, will you let everyone see that even in your years you have gained no sense? [805] Must you live on to disgrace your old age?

Oedipus
You have a clever tongue, but I know no just man who can produce from every side a pretty speech.

Creon
Words may be many, and yet not to the point.

Oedipus
As if yours, indeed, were few, but on the mark.

Creon
[810] They cannot be, not for one whose mind is such as yours.

Oedipus
Begone! I will say it for these men too. And do not besiege me with a jealous watch where I am destined to remain.

Creon
I call these men, and not you, to witness the tenor of your words to your friends. And if I ever catch you—

Oedipus
[815] And who could catch me against the will of these allies?

Creon
I promise you, soon you will be pained even without that.

Oedipus
Where is the deed which backs that threatening word?

Creon
One of your two daughters I have myself just seized and sent away. The other I will drag off immediately.

Oedipus
[820] Oh, no!

Creon
You will soon find more to weep about.

Oedipus
You have my child?

Creon
And I will have this one in no long time.

Oedipus
Oh! Strangers, what will you do? Will you betray me? Will you not drive the godless man from this land?

Chorus
Depart, stranger! Quick! [825] Your present deed is not just, nor the deed which you have done.

Creon
To his attendants.
It is time for you to drag this girl off against her will, if she will not go freely.

Antigone
Wretched that I am! Where can I flee? Where find help from gods or men?

Chorus
What are you doing, stranger?

Creon
[830] I will not touch this man, but her who is mine.

Oedipus
Lords of the land!

Chorus
Stranger, you are acting unjustly.

Creon
Justly.

Chorus
How?

Creon
I take my own.

He lays his hand on Antigone.

Oedipus
Oh, city !

Chorus
What are you doing, stranger? Release her! [835] Your strength and ours will soon come to the test.

Creon
Stand back!

Chorus
Not while this is your purpose.

Creon
There will be war with Thebes for you, if you harm me.

Oedipus
Did I not say so?

Chorus
Unhand the girl at once!

Creon
[840] Do not make commands where you are not the master.

Chorus
Let go, I tell you!

Creon
To his guards, who seize Antigone.
And I tell you: be off!

Chorus
Help, men of Colonus, bring help! The city, our city, is attacked by force! Come to our aid!

Antigone
I am being dragged away in misery. Strangers, strangers!

Oedipus
[845] My child, where are you?

Antigone
I am led off by force.

Oedipus
Give me your hand, my child!

Antigone
I am helpless.

Creon
Away with you!

Oedipus
I am wretched, wretched!The guards exit with Antigone.

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hide References (6 total)
  • Commentary references to this page (3):
    • Sir Richard C. Jebb, Commentary on Sophocles: Oedipus Tyrannus, 1110-1185
    • Sir Richard C. Jebb, Commentary on Sophocles: Antigone, 1067
    • Sir Richard C. Jebb, Commentary on Sophocles: Trachiniae, 1112
  • Cross-references to this page (3):
    • William Watson Goodwin, Syntax of the Moods and Tenses of the Greek Verb, Chapter II
    • Basil L. Gildersleeve, Syntax of Classical Greek, Tenses
    • Basil L. Gildersleeve, Syntax of Classical Greek, Moods
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