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[17]

Most of the demes, if not all, have numerous stories of a character both mythical and historical connected with them; Aphidna, for example, has the rape of Helen by Theseus, the sacking of the place by the Dioscuri and their recovery of their sister; Marathon has the Persian battle; Rhamnus has the statue of Nemesis, which by some is called the work of Diodotus and by others of Agoracritus the Parian, a work which both in grandeur and in beauty is a great success and rivals the works of Pheidias; and so with Deceleia, the base of operations of the Peloponnesians in the Deceleian War; and Phyle, whence Thrasybulus brought the popular party back to the Peiraeus and then to the city. And so, also, in the case of several other demes there are many historical incidents to tell; and, further, the Leocorium and the Theseium have myths connected with them, and so has the Lyceium, and the Olympicum (the Olympium is the same thing), which the king1 who dedicated it left half finished at his death. And in like manner also the Academia, and the gardens of the philosophers, and the Odeium, and the colonnade called "Poecile,"2 and the temples in the city containing very many marvellous works of different artists.

1 Antiochus Epiphanes, of the Seleucid Dynasty (reigned 175—164 B.C.). See Frazer, note on Paus. 1.18.6

2 "Varicolored." The painting was done by Polygnotus, about the middle of the fifth century B.C.

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load focus English (H.C. Hamilton, Esq., W. Falconer, M.A., 1903)
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