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SIMO and DAVUS.

DAVUS
aside, coming away from the door of the house. He now supposes that I'm bringing some trick to bear against him, and that on that account I've remained here.

SIMO
What does he say, Davus ?1

DAVUS
Just as much as nothing.2

SIMO
What, nothing? Eh?

DAVUS
Nothing at all.

SIMO
And yet I certainly was expecting something.

DAVUS
It has turned out contrary to your expectations. Aside. I perceive it; this vexes the man.

SIMO
Are you able to tell me the truth?

DAVUS
I? Nothing more easy.

SIMO
Is this marriage at all disagreeable to him, on account of his intimacy with this foreign woman?

DAVUS
No, faith; or if at all, it is a two or three days' annoyance this--you understand. It will then cease. Moreover, he himself has thought over this matter in a proper way.

SIMO
I commend him.

DAVUS
While it was allowed him, and while his years prompted him, he intrigued; even then it was secretly. He took precaution that that circumstance should never be a cause of disgrace to him, as behooves a man of principle; now that he must have a wife, he has set his mind upon a wife.

SIMO
He seemed to me to be somewhat melancholy in a slight degree.

DAVUS
Not at all on account of her, but there's something he blames you for.

SIMO
What is it, pray?

DAVUS
It's a childish thing.

SIMO
What is it?

DAVUS
Nothing at all.

SIMO
Nay but, tell me what it is.

DAVUS
He says that you are making too sparing preparations.

SIMO
What, I?

DAVUS
You.--He says that there has hardly been fare provided to the amount of ten drachmae.3--"Does he seem to be bestowing a wife on his son? Which one now, in preference, of my companions shall I invite to the dinner?" And, it must be owned, you really are providing too parsimoniously--I do not commend you.

SIMO
Hold your tongue.

DAVUS
aside. I've touched him up.

SIMO
I'll see that these things are properly done. DAVUS goes into the house. What's the meaning of this? What does this old rogue mean? But if there's any knavery here, why, he's sure to be the source of the mischief. Goes into his house.

1 What does he say, Davus?: “"Quid, Dave, narrat?"” This reading Vollbehr suggests in place of the old one, "Quid Davus narrat ?" and upon good grounds, as it appears. According to the latter reading we are to suppose that Davus is grumbling to himself, on which Simo says, " What does Davus say?" It seems, however, much more likely that Davus accompanies Pamphilus to the door, and speaks to him before he goes in, and then, on his return to Simo, the latter asks him, "What does he say, Davus ?"

2 Just as much as nothing: “"Aeque quidquam nunc quidem."” This is a circumlocution for "nothing at all:" somewhat more literally perhaps, it might be rendered "just as much as before." Perizonius supplies the ellipsis with a long string of Latin words, which translated would mean, "Now, indeed, he says equally as much as he says then, when he says nothing at all."

3 Amount of ten drachmoe: The Attic drachma was a silver coin worth in value about 9¾d. of English money.

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