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Enter BACCHIS and PHRYGIA, from the house of CHREMES.

BACCHIS.
pretending not to see CLINIA and SYRUS. To a very fine purpose,1 upon my faith, have the promises of Syrus brought me hither, who agreed to lend me ten minae. If now he deceives me, oft as he may entreat me to come, he shall come in vain. Or else, when I've promised to come, and fixed the time, when he has carried word back for certain, and Clitipho is on the stretch of expectation, I'll disappoint him and not come. Syrus will make atonement to me with his back.

CLINIA
apart, to SYRUS. She promises you very fairly.

SYRUS
to CLINIA. But do you think she is in jest? She'll do it, if I don't take care.

BACCHIS.
aside. They're asleep2--I'faith, I'll rouse them. Aloud. My dear Phrygia, did you hear about the country-seat of Charinus, which that man was showing us just now ?

PHRYGIA
I heard of it.

BACCHIS.
aloud. That it was the next to the farm here on the right-hand side.3

PHRYGIA
I remember.

BACCHIS.
aloud. Run thither post-haste; the Captain is keeping the feast of Bacchus4 at his house.

SYRUS
apart. What is she going to be at?

BACCHIS.
aloud. Tell him I am here very much against my inclination, and am detained; but that by some means or other I'll give them the slip and come to him. PHRYGIA moves.

SYRUS
coming forward. Upon my faith, I'm ruined! Bacchis, stay, stay; prithee, where are you sending her ? Order her to stop.

BACCHIS.
to PHRYGIA. Be off.

SYRUS
Why, the money's ready.

BACCHIS.
Why, then I'll stay. PHRYGIA returns.

SYRUS
And it will be given you presently.

BACCHIS.
Just when you please; do I press you ?

SYRUS
But do you know what you are to do, pray?

BACCHIS.
What ?

SYRUS
You must now go over to the house of Menedemus, and your equipage must be taken over thither.

BACCHIS.
What scheme are you upon, you rascal?

SYRUS
What, I ? Coining money to give you.

BACCHIS.
Do you think me a proper person for you to play upon ?

SYRUS
It's not without a purpose.

BACCHIS.
pointing to the house. Why, have I any business then with you here?

SYRUS
O no; I'm only going to give you what's your own.

BACCHIS.
Then let's be going.5

SYRUS
Follow this way. Goes to the door of MENEDIEMUS, and calls. Ho there! Dromo. Enter DROMO from the house.

DROMO
Who is it wants me ?

SYRUS
Syrus.

DROMO
What's the matter?

SYRUS
Take over all the attendants of Bacchis to your house here immediately.

DROMO
Why so?

SYRUS
Ask no questions. Let them take what they brought here with them. The old gentleman will hope his expenses are lightened by their departure; for sure he little knows how much loss this trifling gain will bring him. You, Dromo, if you are wise, know nothing of what you do know.

DROMO
You shall own that I'm dumb. CLINIA, BACCHIS, and PHRYGIA go into the house of MENEDEMUS, and DROMO follows with BACCHIS'S retinue and baggage.

1 To a very fine purpose: " Satis pol proterve," &c. C. Laelius was said to have assisted Terence in the composition of his Plays, and in confirmation of this, the following story is told by Cornelius Nepos: " C. Laelius, happening to pass the Matronalia [a Festival on the first of March, when the husband, for once in the year, was bound to obey the wife] at his villa near Puteoli, was told that dinner was waiting, but still neglected the summons. At last, when he made his appearance, he excused himself by saying that he had been in a particular vein of composition, and quoted certain lines which occur in the Heautontimorumenos, namely, those beginning ' Satis pol proterve me Syri promissa hue induxerunt.'"

2 They're asleep: "Dormiunt." This is clearly used figuratively, though Hedelin interprets it literally.

3 Farm here on the right-hand side: Cooke suggests that the Poet makes Bacchis call the house of Charinus "villa," and that of Chremes "fundus" (which signifies " a farm-house," or "farm"), for the purpose of exalting the one and depreciating the other in the hearing of Syrus.

4 The feast of Bacchus: This passage goes far to prove that the Dionysia here mentioned as being celebrated, were those κάτ̓ ὰγρους, or the " rural Dionysia."

5 Let's be going: Colman here remarks to the following effect: "There is some difficulty in this and the next speech in the original, and the Commentators have been puzzled to make sense of them. It seems to me that the Poet's intention is no more than this: Bacchis expresses some reluctance to act under the direction of Syrus, but is at length prevailed on, finding that he can by those means contrive to pay her the money which he has promised her."

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