previous next

Enter SOSTRATA.

SOSTRATA
to herself. In dreadful alarm, I have for some time heard, I know not what confusion going on here; I'm sadly afraid Philumena's illness is getting worse. Aesculapius, I do entreat thee, and thee, Health,1 that it may not be so. Now I'll go visit her. Approaches the door.

PARMENO
coming forward. Hark you, Sostrata.

SOSTRATA
turning round. Well.

PARMENO
You will again be shut out there.

SOSTRATA
What, Parmeno, is it you? I'm undone! wretch that I am, what shall I do? Am I not to go see the wife of Pamphilus, when she is ill here next door?

PARMENO
Not go see her! Don't even send any person for the purpose of seeing her; for I'm of opinion that he who loves, a person to whom he is an object of dislike, commits a double mistake: he himself takes a useless trouble, and causes annoyance to the other. Besides, your son went in to see how she is, as soon as he arrived.

SOSTRATA
What is it you say? Has Pamphilus arrived?

PARMENO
He has.

SOSTRATA
I give thanks unto the Gods! Well, through that news my spirits are revived, and anxiety has departed from my heart.

PARMENO
For this reason, then, I am especially unwilling you should go in there; for if Philumena's malady at all abates, she will, I am sure, when they are by themselves, at once tell him all the circumstances; both what misunderstandings have arisen between you, and how the difference first began. But see, he's coming out-how sad he looks! Re-enter PAMPHILUS, from the house of PHIDIPPUS.

SOSTRATA
running up to him. O my son! Embraces him.

PAMPHILUS
My mother, blessings on you.

SOSTRATA
I rejoice that you are returned safe. Is Philumena in a fair way?

PAMPHILUS
She is a little better. Weeping.

SOSTRATA
Would that the Gods may grant it so! Why, then, do you weep, or why so dejected?

PAMPHILUS
All's well, mother.

SOSTRATA
What meant that confusion? Tell me; was she suddenly taken ill?

PAMPHILUS
Such was the fact.

SOSTRATA
What is her malady?

PAMPHILUS
A fever.

SOSTRATA
An intermitting one?2

PAMPHILUS
So they say. Go in the house, please, mother; I'll follow you immediately.

SOSTRATA
Very well. Goes into her house.

PAMPHILUS
Do you run and meet the servants, Parmeno, and help them with the baggage.

PARMENO
Why, don't they know the way themselves to come to our house?

PAMPHILUS
stamping. Do you loiter? (Exit PARMENO.)

1 And thee, Health: She invokes Aesculapius, the God of Medicine, and "Salus," or "Health," because, in Greece, their statues were always placed near each other; so that to have offered prayers to one and not to the other, would have been deemed a high indignity. On the worship of Aesculapius, see the opening Scene of the Curculio of Plautus.

2 An intermitting one: "Quotidiana," literally, "daily."

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 United States License.

An XML version of this text is available for download, with the additional restriction that you offer Perseus any modifications you make. Perseus provides credit for all accepted changes, storing new additions in a versioning system.

load focus Latin (Edward St. John Parry, Edward St. John Parry, M.A., 1857)
hide Places (automatically extracted)

View a map of the most frequently mentioned places in this document.

Download Pleiades ancient places geospacial dataset for this text.

hide References (4 total)
  • Commentary references to this page (2):
  • Cross-references to this page (2):
hide Display Preferences
Greek Display:
Arabic Display:
View by Default:
Browse Bar: