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[12] and think of the power of expression, which enables us to impart to one another all good things by teaching and to take our share of them, to enact laws and to administer states.”

“Truly, Socrates, it does appear that the gods devote much care to man.”

“Yet again, in so far as we are powerless of ourselves to foresee what is expedient for the future,1 the gods lend us their aid, revealing the issues by divination to inquirers, and teaching them how to obtain the best results.”

“With you, Socrates, they seem to deal even more friendly than with other men, if it is true that, even unasked, they warn you by signs what to do and what not to do.”

1 Cyropaedia I. vi. 46.

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