previous next

[344a] what you say is not true, for it is not being but becoming good, indeed—in hands and feet and mind foursquare, fashioned without reproach—that is truly hard. In this way we see a purpose in the insertion of “indeed,” and that the “truly” is correctly placed at the end; and all that comes after corroborates this view of his meaning. There are many points in the various expressions of the poem


Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 United States License.

An XML version of this text is available for download, with the additional restriction that you offer Perseus any modifications you make. Perseus provides credit for all accepted changes, storing new additions in a versioning system.

load focus Notes (James A. Towle, 1889)
load focus Greek (1903)
hide Places (automatically extracted)

View a map of the most frequently mentioned places in this document.

Download Pleiades ancient places geospacial dataset for this text.

hide References (10 total)
  • Commentary references to this page (7):
    • James A. Towle, Commentary on Plato: Protagoras, 343d
    • James A. Towle, Commentary on Plato: Protagoras, 347e
    • James A. Towle, Commentary on Plato: Protagoras, 351e
    • J. Adam, A. M. Adam, Commentary on Plato, Protagoras, CHAPTER XIV
    • J. Adam, A. M. Adam, Commentary on Plato, Protagoras, CHAPTER XXIX
    • J. Adam, A. M. Adam, Commentary on Plato, Protagoras, CHAPTER XXXV
    • James Adam, The Republic of Plato, 5.475E
  • Cross-references to this page (1):
    • Raphael Kühner, Bernhard Gerth, Ausführliche Grammatik der griechischen Sprache, KG 3.6.1
  • Cross-references in general dictionaries to this page (2):
hide Display Preferences
Greek Display:
Arabic Display:
View by Default:
Browse Bar: