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[359a] Here also they were all in agreement.

So much, then, being granted, Prodicus and Hippias, I said, let our friend Protagoras vindicate the correctness of the answer he made at first—not that which he made at the very beginning,1 when he said that, while there were five parts of virtue, none of them was like any other, but each had its particular function: I do not refer to that, but the statement he made afterwards,2 when he proceeded to say that four of them had a considerable resemblance to each other,


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hide References (9 total)
  • Commentary references to this page (5):
    • James A. Towle, Commentary on Plato: Protagoras, 339d
    • James A. Towle, Commentary on Plato: Protagoras, 351c
    • J. Adam, A. M. Adam, Commentary on Plato, Protagoras, CHAPTER XVIII
    • J. Adam, A. M. Adam, Commentary on Plato, Protagoras, CHAPTER XXXIX
    • J. Adam, A. M. Adam, Commentary on Plato, Protagoras, CHAPTER XXXVIII
  • Cross-references to this page (1):
    • Basil L. Gildersleeve, Syntax of Classical Greek, The Article
  • Cross-references in notes from this page (2):
    • Plato, Protagoras, 330a
    • Plato, Protagoras, 349d
  • Cross-references in general dictionaries to this page (1):
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