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79. Thus spake the Athenians. After the Lacedaemonians had heard both the complaints of the confederates against the Athenians and the Athenians' answer, they put them everyone out of the court and consulted of the business among themselves. [2] And the opinions of the greatest part concurred in this, that the Athenians had done unjustly and ought speedily to be warred on. But Archidamus their king, a man reputed both wise and temperate, spake as followeth.

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hide References (14 total)
  • Commentary references to this page (5):
    • T. G. Tucker, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 8, 8.70
    • C.E. Graves, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 5, 5.89
    • E.C. Marchant, Commentary on Thucydides Book 1, 1.72
    • Harold North Fowler, Commentary on Thucydides Book 5, 5.111
    • Charles D. Morris, Commentary on Thucydides Book 1, Introduction
  • Cross-references to this page (4):
    • Herbert Weir Smyth, A Greek Grammar for Colleges, PREPOSITIONS
    • Raphael Kühner, Bernhard Gerth, Ausführliche Grammatik der griechischen Sprache, KG 1.3.2
    • William Watson Goodwin, Syntax of the Moods and Tenses of the Greek Verb, Chapter II
    • Basil L. Gildersleeve, Syntax of Classical Greek, Forms of the subject.
  • Cross-references in general dictionaries to this page (5):
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