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78. About the same time also, the soldiers of the Peloponnesian fleet at Miletus murmured amongst themselves that Astyochus and Tissaphernes overthrew the state of their affairs. Astyochus in refusing to fight, both before, when their own fleet was stronger and that of the Athenians but small, and also now, whilst they were said to be in sedition and their fleet divided; and in expecting the Phoenician fleet, in fame, not in fact to come from Tissaphernes; and Tissaphernes, in that he not only brought not in that fleet of his but also impaired theirs by not giving them their pay, neither fully nor continually; and that they therefore ought no longer to delay time, but to hazard battle. This was urged principally by the Syracusians.

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load focus English (Benjamin Jowett, 1881)
load focus English (1910)
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hide References (15 total)
  • Commentary references to this page (7):
    • T. G. Tucker, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 8, 8.80
    • T. G. Tucker, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 8, 8.83
    • T. G. Tucker, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 8, 8.85
    • T. G. Tucker, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 8, 8.87
    • T. G. Tucker, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 8, 8.90
    • C.E. Graves, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 4, CHAPTER LXXII
    • Charles D. Morris, Commentary on Thucydides Book 1, 1.109
  • Cross-references to this page (1):
    • Raphael Kühner, Bernhard Gerth, Ausführliche Grammatik der griechischen Sprache, KG 1.4.2
  • Cross-references in general dictionaries to this page (7):
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