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13. 'These were the reasons, Lacedaemonians and allies, and the grievances which led us to1 revolt. They were clear enough to prove to all hearers the justice of our cause, and strong enough to alarm us and drive us to seek some deliverance. We have acted from no sudden impulse; long ago, before the war began, we sent envoys to you, and proposed to revolt. But we could not, because you refused our request. Now, however, when the Boeotians have invited us, we have at once obeyed the call. We were intending to make a double severance of ourselves, from the Hellenes and from the Athenians; from the guilt, that is, of oppressing the Hellenes, in concert with the Athenians, instead of aiding in their liberation, and from the ruin which the Athenians were sooner or later sure to bring upon us, unless we anticipated them. [2] But the step has been taken hastily and without due preparation; hence you are the more bound to receive us into alliance and to send us speedy help, thereby showing that you are ready to protect those who have claims upon you and to strike a blow at your enemies. [3] Never was there such an opportunity before. The Athenians are exhausted by pestilence and by a costly war; some of their ships are cruising about your shores; the remainder are threatening us; [4] so that they are not likely to have many to spare if you, in the course of this summer, make a second attack upon them by land and by sea. They will not be able to meet you at sea; or, if they do, they will have to withdraw their forces both from Lesbos and from Peloponnesus. [5] And let no one say to himself that he is going to incur a danger which will be his own on behalf of a country which is not his own. He may think that Lesbos is a long way off; but he will find that the help which we bring will be very near him. For the war will not be fought in Attica, as might be imagined; [6] but in those countries by which Attica is supported. The revenues of the Athenians are derived from their allies, and, if they subdue us, will be greater than ever; no one will revolt again, and our resources will be added to theirs; and we shall suffer worse things than those who have been enslaved already. [7] But, if you assist us heartily, you will gain the alliance of a great naval power, and a navy is your chief want; you will draw away the allies of the Athenians, who will fearlessly come over to you; thus you will more easily overthrow the power of Athens. And you will no longer incur, as in times past, the reproach of deserting those who revolt2 If you come forward as their liberators your final triumph will be assured.

1 Our revolt, though premature, was not rash; it had a double motive: we feared the Athenians and sympathised with Hellas. But we look to you for help. Now is your opportunity for attacking Athens by sea. The battle must be fought in the countries on which Athens depends.

2 Cp. 1.40 fin.; 1.69.

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  • Commentary references to this page (64):
    • Sir Richard C. Jebb, Commentary on Sophocles: Electra, 1026
    • Sir Richard C. Jebb, Commentary on Sophocles: Philoctetes, 1398
    • E.C. Marchant, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 2, 2.13
    • E.C. Marchant, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 2, 2.2
    • E.C. Marchant, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 2, 2.70
    • E.C. Marchant, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 2, 2.8
    • E.C. Marchant, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 3, 3.11
    • E.C. Marchant, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 3, 3.16
    • Charles F. Smith, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 3, 3.10
    • Charles F. Smith, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 3, 3.105
    • Charles F. Smith, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 3, 3.106
    • Charles F. Smith, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 3, 3.109
    • Charles F. Smith, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 3, 3.112
    • Charles F. Smith, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 3, 3.13
    • Charles F. Smith, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 3, 3.15
    • Charles F. Smith, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 3, 3.16
    • Charles F. Smith, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 3, 3.17
    • Charles F. Smith, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 3, 3.18
    • Charles F. Smith, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 3, 3.2
    • Charles F. Smith, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 3, 3.22
    • Charles F. Smith, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 3, 3.31
    • Charles F. Smith, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 3, 3.32
    • Charles F. Smith, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 3, 3.39
    • Charles F. Smith, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 3, 3.4
    • Charles F. Smith, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 3, 3.49
    • Charles F. Smith, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 3, 3.55
    • Charles F. Smith, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 3, 3.57
    • Charles F. Smith, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 3, 3.59
    • Charles F. Smith, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 3, 3.62
    • Charles F. Smith, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 3, 3.63
    • Charles F. Smith, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 3, 3.65
    • Charles F. Smith, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 3, 3.67
    • Charles F. Smith, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 3, 3.70
    • Charles F. Smith, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 3, 3.78
    • Charles F. Smith, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 3, 3.81
    • Charles F. Smith, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 3, 3.92
    • Charles F. Smith, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 3, 3.93
    • T. G. Tucker, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 8, 8.76
    • C.E. Graves, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 4, CHAPTER I
    • C.E. Graves, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 4, CHAPTER XVII
    • C.E. Graves, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 4, CHAPTER XXXI
    • C.E. Graves, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 4, CHAPTER VI
    • C.E. Graves, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 5, 5.31
    • Harold North Fowler, Commentary on Thucydides Book 5, 5.3
    • Harold North Fowler, Commentary on Thucydides Book 5, 5.31
    • Harold North Fowler, Commentary on Thucydides Book 5, 5.34
    • Harold North Fowler, Commentary on Thucydides Book 5, 5.53
    • Harold North Fowler, Commentary on Thucydides Book 5, 5.6
    • Charles D. Morris, Commentary on Thucydides Book 1, 1.11
    • Charles D. Morris, Commentary on Thucydides Book 1, 1.127
    • Charles D. Morris, Commentary on Thucydides Book 1, 1.138
    • Charles D. Morris, Commentary on Thucydides Book 1, 1.30
    • Charles D. Morris, Commentary on Thucydides Book 1, 1.34
    • Charles D. Morris, Commentary on Thucydides Book 1, 1.4
    • Charles D. Morris, Commentary on Thucydides Book 1, 1.44
    • Charles D. Morris, Commentary on Thucydides Book 1, Speech of King Archidamus. Chaps. 80-85.
    • Charles D. Morris, Commentary on Thucydides Book 1, 1.81
    • Charles D. Morris, Commentary on Thucydides Book 1, 1.81
    • Charles D. Morris, Commentary on Thucydides Book 1, 1.83
    • Charles D. Morris, Commentary on Thucydides Book 1, 1.89
    • Charles F. Smith, Commentary on Thucydides Book 7, 7.18
    • Charles F. Smith, Commentary on Thucydides Book 7, 7.22
    • Charles F. Smith, Commentary on Thucydides Book 7, 7.4
    • Charles F. Smith, Commentary on Thucydides Book 7, 7.48
  • Cross-references to this page (9):
    • Herbert Weir Smyth, A Greek Grammar for Colleges, THE VERB: VOICES
    • Herbert Weir Smyth, A Greek Grammar for Colleges, THE PARTICIPLE
    • Herbert Weir Smyth, A Greek Grammar for Colleges, SOME GRAMMATICAL AND RHETORICAL FIGURES
    • Raphael Kühner, Bernhard Gerth, Ausführliche Grammatik der griechischen Sprache, KG 1.3.1
    • Raphael Kühner, Bernhard Gerth, Ausführliche Grammatik der griechischen Sprache, KG 1.3.2
    • Raphael Kühner, Bernhard Gerth, Ausführliche Grammatik der griechischen Sprache, KG 1.4.2
    • Raphael Kühner, Bernhard Gerth, Ausführliche Grammatik der griechischen Sprache, KG 3.pos=7.4
    • Basil L. Gildersleeve, Syntax of Classical Greek, Tenses
    • Basil L. Gildersleeve, Syntax of Classical Greek, The Particle ἄν
  • Cross-references in notes to this page (3):
    • Thucydides, History of the Peloponnesian War, Thuc. 6.78
    • Thucydides, History of the Peloponnesian War, Thuc. 8.100
    • Thucydides, History of the Peloponnesian War, Thuc. 8.5
  • Cross-references in notes from this page (2):
    • Thucydides, Histories, 1.40
    • Thucydides, Histories, 1.69
  • Cross-references in general dictionaries to this page (23):
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