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26. With the return of summer the Peloponnesians despatched the two and forty ships which1 they intended for Mytilenè in charge of Alcidas, the Lacedaemonian admiral.2 They and their allies then invaded Attica, in order that the Athenians, embarrassed both by sea and land, might have their attention distracted from the ships sailing to Mytilenè. Cleomenes led the invasion. [2] He was acting in the place of his nephew, the king Pausanias, son of Pleistoanax, who was still a minor. [3] All the country which they had previously overrun, wherever anything had grown up again, they ravaged afresh, and devastated even those districts which they had hitherto spared. This invasion caused greater distress to the Athenians than any, except the second. [4] For the Peloponnesians, who were daily expecting to hear from Lesbos of some action on the part of the fleet, which they supposed by this time to have crossed the sea, pursued their ravages far and wide. But when none of their expectations were realized, and their food was exhausted, they retired and dispersed to their several cities.

1 B.C. 427.

2 After despatching a fleet under Alcidas to Lesbos, the Peloponnesians invade Attica, using great distress.

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  • Commentary references to this page (19):
    • Sir Richard C. Jebb, Commentary on Sophocles: Trachiniae, 1176
    • W. W. How, J. Wells, A Commentary on Herodotus, 6.72
    • E.C. Marchant, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 3, 3.13
    • Charles F. Smith, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 3, 3.1
    • Charles F. Smith, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 3, 3.1
    • Charles F. Smith, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 3, 3.2
    • Charles F. Smith, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 3, 3.29
    • Charles F. Smith, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 3, 3.69
    • Charles F. Smith, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 3, 3.89
    • Charles F. Smith, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 3, 3.93
    • C.E. Graves, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 4, CHAPTER XXXIX
    • C.E. Graves, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 5, 5.17
    • C.E. Graves, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 5, 5.71
    • C.E. Graves, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 5, 5.89
    • Charles D. Morris, Commentary on Thucydides Book 1, 1.114
    • Charles D. Morris, Commentary on Thucydides Book 1, 1.13
    • Charles D. Morris, Commentary on Thucydides Book 1, 1.30
    • Charles F. Smith, Commentary on Thucydides Book 7, 7.19
    • Charles F. Smith, Commentary on Thucydides Book 7, 7.22
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  • Cross-references in general dictionaries to this page (9):
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