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70. Now Corcyra had been in an unsettled state ever since the return of the prisoners who were1 taken at sea in the Epidamnian war2, and afterwards released by the Corinthians. They were nominally let out on bail for a sum of eight hundred talents3 on the security of their proxeni, but in reality they had been induced to try and gain over Corcyra to the Corinthian interest. [2] They went from one citizen to another, and did their best with them to bring about a revolt from Athens. On the arrival of an Athenian and also of a Corinthian vessel conveying ambassadors, there was a discussion in the assembly, and the Corcyraeans voted that they would continue allies of Athens according to their agreement4, but would renew their former friendship with the Peloponnesians. [3] A certain Peithias, who voluntarily acted as the proxenus of5 the Athenians and was the popular leader, was summoned by the partisans of the Peloponnesians to take his trial, they affirming that he wanted to bring Corcyra under the yoke of Athens. [4] He was acquitted, and then he in turn summoned their five richest men, declaring that they were in the habit of cutting poles for vines in the sacred precinct of Zeus and Alcinous; [5] now for each pole the, penalty was fixed at a state6 They were condemned; but the fine was so excessive that they went and sat as suppliants in the temple of Zeus and Alcinous, begging that they might pay the money by instalments. [6] Peithias, who happened to be a member of the senate as well as the popular leader, persuaded the senators to put the law in execution. The culprits, knowing that the law was against them, and perceiving that Peithias7 as long as he remained in the senate would try to induce the people8 to make an alliance offensive and defensive with Athens, conspired together, and, rushing into the council chamber with daggers in their hands, slew him and others to the number of sixty, as well private persons as senators. A few who were of the same party with him took refuge in the Athenian trireme, which had not yet left.

1 Unsettled state of Corcyra, originating in the intrigues of the prisoners who had returned from Corinth.

2 Cp. 1.55 med.

3 £160,000.

4 Cp. 1.44.

5 Trial of Peithias, the popular leader. His acquittal. Trial of the oligarchs, and murder of Peithias and of sixty others.

6 If the gold state, about 16s.; if the silver Athenian starter, about 2s. 8d.; if the silver Corinthian state (didrachmon) (tetradrachmon), about 1s. 4d.

7 Or, 'before he ceased to be a senator would persuade the people.'

8 Or, 'before he ceased to be a senator would persuade the people.'

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  • Commentary references to this page (45):
    • W. W. How, J. Wells, A Commentary on Herodotus, 3.55
    • E.C. Marchant, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 3, 3.80
    • E.C. Marchant, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 6, 6.6
    • E.C. Marchant, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 7, 7.48
    • Charles F. Smith, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 3, 3.106
    • Charles F. Smith, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 3, 3.14
    • Charles F. Smith, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 3, 3.28
    • Charles F. Smith, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 3, 3.39
    • Charles F. Smith, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 3, 3.45
    • Charles F. Smith, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 3, 3.50
    • Charles F. Smith, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 3, 3.64
    • Charles F. Smith, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 3, 3.68
    • Charles F. Smith, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 3, 3.69
    • Charles F. Smith, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 3, 3.71
    • Charles F. Smith, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 3, 3.72
    • Charles F. Smith, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 3, 3.75
    • Charles F. Smith, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 3, 3.8
    • Charles F. Smith, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 3, 3.80
    • Charles F. Smith, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 3, 3.81
    • Charles F. Smith, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 3, 3.94
    • Charles F. Smith, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 3, 3.96
    • C.E. Graves, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 4, CHAPTER CXXXII
    • C.E. Graves, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 4, CHAPTER II
    • C.E. Graves, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 4, CHAPTER XXIII
    • C.E. Graves, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 4, CHAPTER LVIII
    • C.E. Graves, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 5, 5.16
    • C.E. Graves, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 5, 5.25
    • C.E. Graves, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 5, 5.47
    • C.E. Graves, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 5, 5.82
    • W. Walter Merry, James Riddell, D. B. Monro, Commentary on the Odyssey (1886), 6.293
    • Harold North Fowler, Commentary on Thucydides Book 5, 5.10
    • Harold North Fowler, Commentary on Thucydides Book 5, 5.108
    • Harold North Fowler, Commentary on Thucydides Book 5, 5.16
    • Harold North Fowler, Commentary on Thucydides Book 5, 5.82
    • Charles D. Morris, Commentary on Thucydides Book 1, 1.113
    • Charles D. Morris, Commentary on Thucydides Book 1, 1.13
    • Charles D. Morris, Commentary on Thucydides Book 1, The dispute between Corinth and Corcyra. Chaps. 24-55.
    • Charles D. Morris, Commentary on Thucydides Book 1, 1.31
    • Charles D. Morris, Commentary on Thucydides Book 1, 1.55
    • Charles D. Morris, Commentary on Thucydides Book 1, 1.56
    • Charles D. Morris, Commentary on Thucydides Book 1, 1.72
    • Charles D. Morris, Commentary on Thucydides Book 1, 1.84
    • Charles D. Morris, Commentary on Thucydides Book 1, 1.99
    • Charles F. Smith, Commentary on Thucydides Book 7, 7.30
    • Charles F. Smith, Commentary on Thucydides Book 7, 7.43
  • Cross-references to this page (9):
    • Herbert Weir Smyth, A Greek Grammar for Colleges, THE CASES
    • Raphael Kühner, Bernhard Gerth, Ausführliche Grammatik der griechischen Sprache, KG 1.3.1
    • Raphael Kühner, Bernhard Gerth, Ausführliche Grammatik der griechischen Sprache, KG 3.1.4
    • Jeffrey A. Rydberg-Cox, Overview of Greek Syntax, Nouns, Adjectives, and Pronouns
    • A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities (1890), HOSPI´TIUM
    • A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities (1890), PRO´STATES TOU DEMOU
    • Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography (1854), CORCY´RA
    • William Watson Goodwin, Syntax of the Moods and Tenses of the Greek Verb, Chapter IV
    • Basil L. Gildersleeve, Syntax of Classical Greek, Tenses
  • Cross-references in notes to this page (3):
  • Cross-references in notes from this page (2):
    • Thucydides, Histories, 1.44
    • Thucydides, Histories, 1.55
  • Cross-references in general dictionaries to this page (26):
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