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37. The Boeotians and Corinthians, having received from Xenares and Cleobulus and their1 other Lacedaemonian friends the instructions which they were to convey to their own governments, returned to their respective cities. [2] On their way home two Argives high in office, who had been waiting for them on the road, entered into communications with them, in the hope that the Boeotians, like the Corinthians, Eleans, and Mantineans, might join their alliance; if this could only be accomplished, and they could act together, they might easily, they said, go to war or make peace, either with Lacedaemon or with any other power. [3] The Boeotian envoys were pleased at the proposal, for it so happened that the request of the Argives coincided with the instructions of their Lacedaemonian friends. Whereupon the Argives, finding that their proposals were acceptable to the Boeotians, promised to send an embassy to them, and so departed. [4] When the Boeotians returned home they told the Boeotarchs what they had heard, both at Lacedaemon and from the Argives who had met them on their way. The Boeotarchs were glad, and their zeal was quickened when they discovered that the request made to them by their friends in Lacedaemon fell in with the projects of the Argives. [5] Soon afterwards the envoys from Argos appeared, inviting the Boeotians to fulfil their engagement. The Boeotarchs encouraged their proposals, and dismissed them; promising that they would send envoys of their own to negotiate the intended alliance.

1 The Boeotians agree. Two Argives make a similar proposal to them.

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  • Commentary references to this page (15):
    • C.E. Graves, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 4, CHAPTER XVI
    • C.E. Graves, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 4, CHAPTER XVIII
    • Harold North Fowler, Commentary on Thucydides Book 5, 5.111
    • Harold North Fowler, Commentary on Thucydides Book 5, 5.38
    • Harold North Fowler, Commentary on Thucydides Book 5, 5.38
    • Harold North Fowler, Commentary on Thucydides Book 5, 5.4
    • Harold North Fowler, Commentary on Thucydides Book 5, 5.47
    • Harold North Fowler, Commentary on Thucydides Book 5, 5.83
    • Charles D. Morris, Commentary on Thucydides Book 1, 1.109
    • Charles D. Morris, Commentary on Thucydides Book 1, 1.127
    • Charles D. Morris, Commentary on Thucydides Book 1, 1.128
    • Charles D. Morris, Commentary on Thucydides Book 1, 1.39
    • Charles D. Morris, Commentary on Thucydides Book 1, 1.89
    • Charles D. Morris, Commentary on Thucydides Book 1, 1.95
    • Charles D. Morris, Commentary on Thucydides Book 1, Introduction
  • Cross-references to this page (2):
    • Herbert Weir Smyth, A Greek Grammar for Colleges, THE VERB: VOICES
    • William Watson Goodwin, Syntax of the Moods and Tenses of the Greek Verb, Chapter IV
  • Cross-references in general dictionaries to this page (7):
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