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44. The Argives received his message, and thus became aware that the alliance with the Boeotians had been made without the consent of the Athenians, and that a violent quarrel had broken out between Athens and Lacedaemon. So they thought no more about their ambassadors who were at that very moment negotiating the peace with Lacedaemon, but turned1 their thoughts towards Athens. They reflected that Athens was a city which had been their friend of old2; like their own it was governed by a democracy, and would be a powerful ally to them at sea, if they were involved in war. [2] They at once sent envoys to negotiate an alliance with the Athenians; the Eleans and Mantineans joined in the embassy. [3] Thither also came in haste three envoys from Lacedaemon, who were thought likely to be acceptable at Athens—Philocharidas, Leon, and Endius3. They were sent because the Lacedaemonians were afraid that the Athenians in their anger would join the Argive alliance. The envoys while they demanded the restoration of Pylos in return for Panactum, were to apologise for the alliance with the Boeotians, and to explain that it was not made with any view to the injury of Athens.

1 A t his suggestion the Argives, who are partly influenced by the memory of an ancient connexion, partly by democratic sympathy, and also by the hope of a naval alliance, join the Athenians.

2 Cp. 1.102 fin.

3 Cp. 8.6 med.

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hide References (24 total)
  • Commentary references to this page (10):
    • E.C. Marchant, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 2, 2.13
    • E.C. Marchant, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 3, 3.25
    • T. G. Tucker, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 8, 8.6
    • C.E. Graves, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 4, CHAPTER CIV
    • Harold North Fowler, Commentary on Thucydides Book 5, 5.29
    • Harold North Fowler, Commentary on Thucydides Book 5, 5.46
    • Harold North Fowler, Commentary on Thucydides Book 5, 5.48
    • Harold North Fowler, Commentary on Thucydides Book 5, 5.67
    • Harold North Fowler, Commentary on Thucydides Book 5, 5.91
    • Charles D. Morris, Commentary on Thucydides Book 1, 1.2
  • Cross-references to this page (7):
  • Cross-references in notes to this page (2):
  • Cross-references in notes from this page (2):
    • Thucydides, Histories, 1.102
    • Thucydides, Histories, 8.6
  • Cross-references in general dictionaries to this page (3):
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