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Amphitryon comes out of the palace as Lycus and his retinue enter.

Lycus
Amphitryon, it is high time you came forth from the palace; you have been too long arraying yourselves in the robes and trappings of the dead. Come, bid the wife and children of Heracles [705] show themselves outside the house, to die on the conditions you yourselves offered.

Amphitryon
Lord, you persecute me in my misery and heap insult upon me over and above the loss of my son; you should have been more moderate in your zeal, though you are my lord and master. [710] But since you impose death's necessity on me, I must acquiesce; what you wish must be done.

Lycus
Now, where is Megara? where are the children of Alcmena's son?

Amphitryon
She, I believe, so far as I can guess from outside—

Lycus
What grounds do you have to base your fancy on?

Amphitryon
[715] Is sitting as a suppliant on the altar's hallowed steps—

Lycus
Imploring them quite uselessly to save her life.

Amphitryon
And calling on her dead husband, in vain.

Lycus
He is nowhere near, and he certainly will never come.

Amphitryon
No, unless perhaps a god should raise him from the dead.

Lycus
[720] Go to her and bring her from the palace.

Amphitryon
By doing so I should become an accomplice in her murder.

Lycus
Since you have this scruple, I, who have left fear behind, will myself bring out the mother and her children. Follow me, servants, [725] that we may joyfully put an end to this delay of our work.

Amphitryon
Then go your way along the path of fate; for what remains, maybe another will provide. Expect for your evil deeds to find some ill yourself. Lycus and his servants enter the palace. Ah! my aged friends, he is marching fairly to his doom; soon will he lie entangled in the snare [730] of the sword, thinking to slay his neighbors, the villain! I will go, to see him fall dead; for the sight of a foe being slain and paying the penalty of his misdeeds gives pleasure.Amphitryon follows Lycus into the palace.

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  • Commentary references to this page (1):
    • Sir Richard C. Jebb, Commentary on Sophocles: Antigone, 167
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