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Iphigenia
Do you know what to do for me now?

Thoas
It is for you to make it known.

Iphigenia
Put chains on the strangers.

Thoas
Where could they escape you?

Iphigenia
[1205] Hellas knows no faith.

Thoas
Go to get chains, attendants.Some attendants go out.

Iphigenia
And let them bring the strangers here.

Thoas
It will be so.

Iphigenia
And veil their faces with their robes.

Thoas
Before the light of the sun.

Iphigenia
And send some of your servants with me.

Thoas
These will attend you.

Iphigenia
And send someone to announce to the city—

Thoas
That what has happened?

Iphigenia
[1210] That all remain indoors.

Thoas
So that they do not come in contact with murder?

Iphigenia
Yes, for such things are polluted.

Thoas
Go and announce—

Iphigenia
That no one come near the sight.An attendant departs.

Thoas
You are taking good care of the city

Iphigenia
And of the friends to whom I owe the most.

Thoas
You mean this for me.

Iphigenia
. . .

Thoas
The whole city marvels at you, with reason.

Iphigenia
[1215] You stay here before the shrine of the goddess.

Thoas
What shall I do?

Iphigenia
Purify the house with fire.

Thoas
So that you may return to find it pure.

Iphigenia
When the strangers come outside—

Thoas
What must I do?

Iphigenia
Hold your robe over your eyes.

Thoas
So that I do not receive the pollution.

Iphigenia
If I seem to delay too long—

Thoas
What limit of the delay should I keep in mind?

Iphigenia
[1220] Do not wonder at it.

Thoas
Carry out the rites of the goddess well, since you have leisure.

Iphigenia
May this purification fall out as I wish!

Thoas
I pray along with you.

Iphigenia
I see the strangers coming out of the temple now, and the ornaments of the goddess and the new-born lambs, because I will wash blood-pollution away with blood, and the flash of torches and all the rest that [1225] I have set out as purification for the strangers and the goddess. I proclaim to the citizens to keep away from this pollution, if any guard of the temple is purifying his hands for the gods, or if anyone is coming to form a marriage alliance, or is weighted down by childbirth— begone, stand away, so that this defilement does not fall on anyone.

[1230] O lady, maiden daughter of of Leto and Zeus, if I cleanse the stain of murder from these men, and make the sacrifice where I ought to make it, you will dwell in a pure home, and we will be fortunate. I do not speak the rest, but I indicate it to those who know more, the gods and you, goddess.Iphigenia, carrying the statue, joins the procession as it goes out. Thoas and his retinue enter the temple.

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hide References (4 total)
  • Commentary references to this page (1):
    • Sir Richard C. Jebb, Commentary on Sophocles: Oedipus Tyrannus, 513-862
  • Cross-references to this page (2):
    • Herbert Weir Smyth, A Greek Grammar for Colleges, THE VERB: VOICES
    • William Watson Goodwin, Syntax of the Moods and Tenses of the Greek Verb, Chapter IV
  • Cross-references in general dictionaries to this page (1):
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