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Iphigenia
throwing herself into Agamemnon's arms.
[640] I see you, father, joyfully after a long time.

Agamemnon
And I, your father, see you; your words do equal duty for both of us.

Iphigenia
All hail, father! you did well in bringing me here to you.

Agamemnon
I know not how I am to say yes or no to that, my child.

Iphigenia
Ah! how wildly you are looking, spite of your joy at seeing me.

Agamemnon
[645] A man has many cares when he is king and general too.

Iphigenia
Be mine, all mine today; do not turn to moody thoughts.

Agamemnon
Why so I am, all yours today; I have no other thought.

Iphigenia
Then smooth your knitted brow, unbend and smile.

Agamemnon
See! my child, my joy at seeing you is even as it is.

Iphigenia
[650] And do you then have tears streaming from your eyes?

Agamemnon
Yes, for long is the absence from each other, that awaits us.

Iphigenia
I do not know, dear father, I do not know of what you are speaking.

Agamemnon
You are moving my pity all the more by speaking so sensibly.

Iphigenia
My words shall turn to senselessness if that will cheer you more.

Agamemnon
[655] Alas! this silence is too much. You have my thanks.

Iphigenia
Stay with your children at home, father.

Agamemnon
My own wish! But to my sorrow I may not

Iphigenia
Ruin seize their wars and the woes of Menelaus!

Agamemnon
First will that, which has been my life-long ruin, bring ruin to others.

Iphigenia
[660] How long you were absent in the bays of Aulis!

Agamemnon
Yes, and there is still a hindrance to my sending the army forward.

Iphigenia
Where do men say the Phrygians live, father?

Agamemnon
In a land where I wish Paris, the son of Priam, never had dwelt.

Iphigenia
It is a long voyage you are bound on, father, after you leave me.

Agamemnon
[665] You will meet your father again, my daughter.

Iphigenia
Ah! would it were seemly for you to take me as a fellow voyager!

Agamemnon
You too have a voyage to make to a haven where you will remember your father.

Iphigenia
Shall I sail there with my mother or alone?

Agamemnon
All alone, without father or mother.

Iphigenia
[670] What! have you found me a new home, father?

Agamemnon
Enough of this! it is not for girls to know such things.

Iphigenia
Please hurry home from Troy, father, as soon as you have triumphed there.

Agamemnon
There is a sacrifice I have first to offer here.

Iphigenia
Yes, it is your duty to heed religion with aid of holy rites.

Agamemnon
[675] You will witness it, for you will be standing near the libations.

Iphigenia
Am I to lead the dance then round the altar, father?

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