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Chorus
[955] And Dryas's son, the Edonian king swift to rage, was tamed in recompense for his frenzied insults, when, by the will of Dionysus, he was shut in a rocky prison. There the fierce and swelling force of his madness trickled away. [960] That man came to know the god whom in his frenzy he had provoked with mockeries. For he had sought to quell the god-inspired women and the Bacchanalian fire, [965] and he angered the Muses who love the flute.

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  • Commentary references to this page (1):
    • Walter Leaf, Commentary on the Iliad (1900), 6.130
  • Cross-references to this page (1):
    • Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography (1854), EDO´NES
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