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Chorus
Stranger, in this land of fine horses you have come to earth's fairest home, the shining Colonus. [670] Here the nightingale, a constant guest, trills her clear note under the trees of green glades, dwelling amid the wine-dark ivy [675] and the god's inviolate foliage, rich in berries and fruit, unvisited by sun, unvexed by the wind of any storm. Here the reveller Dionysus ever walks the ground, [680] companion of the nymphs that nursed him.

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load focus Notes (Sir Richard C. Jebb, 1899)
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hide References (6 total)
  • Commentary references to this page (2):
    • Sir Richard C. Jebb, Commentary on Sophocles: Oedipus at Colonus, 45
    • Basil L. Gildersleeve, Pindar: The Olympian and Pythian Odes, 14
  • Cross-references to this page (1):
    • Sir Richard C. Jebb, Commentary on Sophocles: Oedipus at Colonus, 18
  • Cross-references in notes to this page (2):
    • Aristotle, Rhetoric, Aristot. Rh. 3.15
    • Sir Richard C. Jebb, Commentary on Sophocles: Oedipus at Colonus, 2
  • Cross-references in general dictionaries to this page (1):
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