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And of the Mysians the captains were Chromis and Ennomus the augur; howbeit with his auguries he warded not off black fate, [860] but was slain beneath the hands of the son of Aeacus, swift of foot, in the river, where Achilles was making havoc of the Trojans and the others as well. And Phorcys and godlike Ascanius led the Phrygians from afar, from Ascania, and were eager to fight in the press of battle. And the Maeonians had captains twain, Mesthles and Antiphus, [865] the two sons of TaIaemenes, whose mother was the nymph of the Gygaean lake; and they led the Maeonians, whose birth was beneath Tmolas. And Nastes again led the Carians, uncouth of speech, who held Miletus and the mountain of Phthires, dense with its leafage, and the streams of Maeander, and the steep crests of Mycale. [870] These were led by captains twain, Amphimachus and Nastes—Nastes and Amphimachus, the glorious children of Nomion. And he1 came to the war all decked with gold, like a girl, fool that he was; but his gold in no wise availed to ward off woeful destruction; nay, he was slain in the river beneath the hands of the son of Aeacus, swift of foot; [875] and Achilles, wise of heart, bare off the gold. And Sarpedon and peerless Glaucus were captains of the Lycians from afar out of Lycia, from the eddying Xanthus.

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  • Commentary references to this page (3):
    • W. W. How, J. Wells, A Commentary on Herodotus, 7.20
    • Walter Leaf, Commentary on the Iliad (1900), 13.3
    • Charles Simmons, The Metamorphoses of Ovid, Books XIII and XIV, 13.255
  • Cross-references to this page (2):
    • Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography (1854), MY´SIA
    • Smith's Bio, E'nnomus
  • Cross-references in notes to this page (1):
  • Cross-references in general dictionaries to this page (1):
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