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[255] So he spoke, and they all hurled their spears, as he bade, eagerly; but Athena made all vain. One man smote the door-post of the well-built hall, another the close-fitting door, another's ashen spear, heavy with bronze, struck upon the wall. [260] But when they had avoided the spears of the wooers, first among them spoke the much-enduring goodly Odysseus: “Friends, now I give the word that we too cast our spears into the throng of the wooers, who are minded to slay us in addition to their former wrongs.” [265] So he spoke, and they all hurled their sharp spears with sure aim. Odysseus smote Demoptolemus, Telemachus Euryades, the swineherd Elatus, and the herdsmen of the cattle slew Peisander. So these all at the same moment bit the vast floor with their teeth, [270] and the wooers drew back to the innermost part of the hall. But the others sprang forward and drew forth their spears from the dead bodies. Then again the wooers hurled their sharp spears eagerly, but Athena made them vain, many as they were. One man [275] smote the door-post of the well-built hall, another the close-fitting door, another's ashen spear, heavy with bronze, struck upon the wall. But Amphimedon smote Telemachus on the hand by the wrist, a grazing blow, and the bronze tore the surface of the skin. And Ctesippus with his long spear [280] grazed the shoulder of Eumaeus above his shield, but the spear flew over and fell upon the ground. Then once more Odysseus, the wise and crafty-minded, and his company hurled their sharp spears into the throng of the wooers, and again Odysseus, the sacker of cities, smote Eurydamas, and Telemachus Amphimedon, the swineherd Polybus, [285] and thereafter the herdsman of the cattle smote Ctesippus in the breast, and boasted over him, saying: “Son of Polytherses, thou lover of revilings, never more at all do thou speak big, yielding to folly, but leave the matter to the gods, since verily they are mightier far. [290] This is thy gift of welcome to match the hoof which of late thou gavest to godlike Odysseus, when he went begging through the house.”

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