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and in as much as at the first on the hazy sea I sprang upon the swift ship in the form of a dolphin, [495] pray to me as Apollo Delphinius; also the altar itself shall be called Delphinius and overlooking1 for ever. Afterwards, sup beside your dark ship and pour an offering to the blessed gods who dwell on Olympus. But when you have put away craving for sweet food, [500] come with me singing the hymn Ie Paean (Hail, Healer!), until you come to the place where you shall keep my rich temple.”

So said Apollo. And they readily harkened to him and obeyed him. First they unfastened the sheets and let down the sail and lowered the mast by the forestays upon the mast-rest. [505] Then, landing upon the beach of the sea, they hauled up the ship from the water to dry land and fixed long stays under it. Also they made an altar upon the beach of the sea, and when they had lit a fire, made an offering of white meal, [510] and prayed standing around the altar as Apollo had bidden them. Then they took their meal by the swift, black ship, and poured an offering to the blessed gods who dwell on Olympus. And when they had put away craving for drink and food, they started out with the lord Apollo, the son of Zeus, to lead them, [515] holding a lyre in his hands, and playing sweetly as he stepped high and featly. So the Cretans followed him to Pytho, marching in time as they chanted the Ie Paean after the manner of the Cretan paean-singers and of those in whose hearts the heavenly Muse has put sweet-voiced song. [520] With tireless feet they approached the ridge and straightway came to Parnassus and the lovely place where they were to dwell honored by many men. There Apollo brought them and showed them his most holy sanctuary and rich temple.

But their spirit was stirred in their dear breasts, [525] and the master of the Cretans asked him, saying:

“Lord, since you have brought us here far from our dear ones and our fatherland, —for so it seemed good to your heart,—tell us now how we shall live. That we would know of you. This land is not to be desired either for vineyards or for pastures [530] so that we can live well thereon and also minister to men.”

1 The epithets are transferred from the god to his altar “Overlooking” is especially an epithet of Zeus, as in Apollonius Rhodius ii. 1124.

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