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Just.
Nay, what could he ever suffer still greater than this?

Unj.
What then will you say if you be conquered by me in this?

Just.
I will be silent: what else can I do?

Unj.
Come, now, tell me; from what class do the advocates come?

Just.
From the blackguards.

Unj.
I believe you. What then? From what class do tragedians come?

Just.
From the blackguards.

Unj.
You say well. But from what class do the public orators come?

Just.
From the blackguards.

Unj.
Then have you perceived that you say nothing to the purpose? And look which class among the audience is the more numerous.

Just.
Well now, I'm looking.

Unj.
What, then, do you see?

Just.
By the gods, the blackguards to be far more numerous. This fellow, at any rate, I know; and him yonder; and this fellow with the long hair.

Unj.
What, then, will you say?

Just.
We are conquered. Ye blackguards, by the gods, receive my cloak, for I desert to you.

Exeunt the Two Causes, and re-enter Socrates and Strepsiades.

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