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Strep.
And many others too; but whatever I learned on each occasion I used to forget immediately, through length of years.

Phid.
Is it for this reason, pray, that you have also lost your cloak?

Strep.
I have not lost it; but have studied it away.

Phid.
What have you made of your slippers, you foolish man?

Strep.
I have expended them, like Pericles, for needful purposes. Come, move, let us go. And then if you obey your father, go wrong if you like. I also know that I formerly obeyed you, a lisping child of six years old, and bought you a go-cart at the Diasia, with the first obolus I received from the Heliaea.

Phid.
You will assuredly some time at length be grieved at this.

Strep.
It is well done of you that you obeyed. Come hither, come hither O Socrates! Come forth, for I bring to you this son of mine, having persuaded him against his will.

Enter Socrates

Soc.
For he is still childish, and not used to the baskets here.

Phid.
You would yourself be used to them if you were hanged.

Strep.
A mischief take you! Do you abuse your teacher?

Soc.
“Were hanged” quoth 'a! How sillily he pronounced it, and with lips wide apart! How can this youth ever learn an acquittal from a trial or a legal summons, or persuasive refutation? And yet Hyperbolus learned this at the cost of a talent.

Strep.
Never mind; teach him. He is clever by nature. Indeed, from his earliest years, when he was a little fellow only so big, he was wont to form houses and carve ships within-doors, and make little wagons of leather, and make frogs out of pomegranate-rinds, you can't think how cleverly. But see that he learns those two causes; the better, whatever it may be; and the worse, which, by maintaining what is unjust, overturns the better. If not both, at any rate the unjust one by all means.

Soc.
He shall learn it himself from the two causes in person.

Exit Socrates

Strep.
I will take my departure. Remember this now, that he is to be able to reply to all just arguments.

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