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The Parricide departs, and the dithyrambic poet Cinesias arrives.

Cinesias
Singing.
“On my light pinions I soar off to Olympus; in its capricious flight my Muse flutters along the thousand paths of poetry in turn ...”

Pisthetaerus
[1375] This is a fellow will need a whole shipload of wings.

Cinesias
Singing.
“... and being fearless and vigorous, it is seeking fresh outlet.”

Pisthetaerus
Welcome, Cinesias, you lime-wood man! Why have you come here twisting your game leg in circles?

Cinesias
Singing.
[1380] “I want to become a bird, a tuneful nightingale.”


Pisthetaerus
Enough of that sort of ditty. Tell me what you want.

Cinesias
Give me wings and I will fly into the topmost airs to gather fresh songs in the clouds, [1385] in the midst of the vapors and the fleecy snow.

Pisthetaerus
Gather songs in the clouds?

Cinesias
'Tis on them the whole of our latter-day art depends. The most brilliant dithyrambs are those that flap [1390] their wings in empty space and are clothed in mist and dense obscurity. To appreciate this, just listen.

Pisthetaerus
Oh! no, no, no!

Cinesias
By Hermes! but indeed you shall.


He sings.
“I shall travel through thine ethereal empire like a winged bird, who cleaveth space with his long neck ...”

Pisthetaerus
[1395] Stop! Way enough!

Cinesias
“... as I soar over the seas, carried by the breath of the winds ...”

Pisthetaerus
By Zeus! I'll cut your breath short. He picks up a pair of wings and begins trying to stop Cinesias' mouth with them.

Cinesias
Running away.
“... now rushing along the tracks of Notus, now nearing Boreas [1400] across the infinite wastes of the ether.”

Ah! old man, that's a pretty and clever idea truly!

Pisthetaerus
What! are you not delighted to be cleaving the air?

Cinesias
To treat a dithyrambic poet, for whom the tribes dispute with each other, in this style!

Pisthetaerus
[1405] Will you stay with us and form a chorus of winged birds as slender as Leotrophides for the Cecropid tribe?

Cinesias
You are making game of me, that's clear; but know that I shall never leave you in peace if I do not have wings wherewith to traverse the air.

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