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Euripides now enters, costumed as Perseus.

Euripides
“Oh! ye gods! to what barbarian land has my swift flight taken me? I am Perseus; [1100] I cleave the plains of the air with my winged feet, and I am carrying the Gorgon's head to Argos.”

Scythian Archer
What, are you talking about the head of Gorgos, the scribe?

Euripides
No, I am speaking of the head of the Gorgon.

Scythian Archer
Why, yes! of Gorgos!

Euripides
[1105] “But what do I behold? A young maiden, beautiful as the immortals, chained to this rock like a vessel in port?”

Mnesilochus
“Take pity on me, oh stranger! I am so unhappy and distraught! Free me from these bonds.”

Scythian Archer
You keep still! a curse upon your impudence! you are going to die, and yet you will be chattering!

Euripides
[1110] “Oh! virgin! I take pity on your chains.”

Scythian Archer
But this is no virgin; he's an old rogue, a cheat and a thief.

Euripides
You have lost your wits, Scythian. This is Andromeda, the daughter of Cepheus.

Scythian Archer
lifting up Mnesilochus' robe
But look at his tool; it's pretty big.

Euripides
[1115] Give me your hand, that I may descend near this young maiden. Each man has his own particular weakness; as for me I am aflame with love for this virgin.

Scythian Archer
Oh! I'm not jealous; and as he has his arse turned this way, [1120] why, I don't care if you make love to him.

Euripides
“Ah! let me release her, and hasten to join her on the bridal couch.”

Scythian Archer
If you are so eager to make the old man, you can bore through the plank, and so get at him.

Euripides
[1125] No, I will break his bonds.

Scythian Archer
Beware of my lash!

Euripides
No matter.

Scythian Archer
This blade shall cut off your head.

Euripides
“Ah! what can be done? what arguments can I use? This savage will understand nothing! [1130] The newest and most cunning fancies are a dead letter to the ignorant. Let us invent some artifice to fit in with his coarse nature.”

He departs.

Scythian Archer
I can see the rascal is trying to outwit me.

Mnesilochus
Ah! Perseus! remember in what condition you are leaving me.

Scythian Archer
[1135] Are you wanting to feel my lash again!

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