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in the same year in which Timarchus was a member of the senate, Hegesandrus, the brother of Crobylus, was a treasurer of the funds of the goddess,1 and together, in right friendly comradeship, they were in the act of stealing a thousand drachmas which belonged to the city. But a reputable man, Pamphilus of the deme Acherdous, who had had some trouble with the defendant and was angry with him, found out what was going on, and at a meeting of the assembly arose and said, “Fellow citizens, a man and a woman are conspiring to steal one thousand drachmas of yours.”

1 Ten treasurers, οἱ ταμίαι τῆς Ἀθηνᾶς, appointed annually by lot, had the care of the treasures and revenues of the Parthenon (Aristot. Const. Ath. 47.). It appears that they also had custody of any state funds that were for the time being unappropriated, the Opistheodomos of the Parthenon serving as their treasury.

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