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But suppose it is not this man, but the one who was hired, that is bringing suit. Now let him come forward and speak—or else let the wise Batalus speak in his stead, that we may know what he will find to say! “Gentlemen of the jury, so-and-so”—it does not matter who—”hired me to be his prostitute for money, and I have done, and still continue to do, according to the terms of the contract, all that a prostitute is under obligation to do; he, however, fails to fulfil the agreement.” Will he not immediately have to face a loud protest from the jurors? For who will not say, “And then do you thrust yourself into the market-place, do you put on a garland,1 do you attempt to do anything else that the rest of us do?” His contract, you see, is of no use to him.

1 See the note on Aeschin. 1.19.

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  • Cross-references in notes from this page (1):
    • Aeschines, Against Timarchus, 19
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