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and if Philip was willing to refer our differences to some state as an equal and impartial arbiter, he said that between Philip and us there was no impartial arbiter. Philip offered to give us Halonnesus; Demosthenes forbade us to accept it if he “gave it,” instead of “giving it back,” quarrelling over syllables.1 And finally, by bestowing crowns of honor on the embassy which Aristodemus led to Thessaly and Magnesia contrary to the provisions of the peace, he violated the peace and prepared the final disaster and the war.

1 The anti-Macedonian party refused to accept the island unless Philip would admit that he had been holding it wrongfully, and so was “giving it back,” not giving it” (ἀποδίδωσιδίδωσιν).

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  • Cross-references to this page (2):
    • Herbert Weir Smyth, A Greek Grammar for Colleges, THE VERB: VOICES
    • William Watson Goodwin, Syntax of the Moods and Tenses of the Greek Verb, Chapter II
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