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[8]

That day and night, accordingly, they remained there, in great perplexity. But Xenophon had a dream; he thought that he was bound in fetters, but that the fetters fell off from him of their own accord, so that he was released and could take as long steps1 as he pleased. When dawn came, he went to Cheirisophus, told him he had hopes that all would be well, and related to him his dream.

1 διαβαίνειν, which also means “to cross” a river (see above). Here lay the good omen of the dream.

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    • C.E. Graves, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 4, CHAPTER XII
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