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[12]

“Whom, then, could we find to speak about it1 to Astyages?” said Cyrus.

“Why,” said they, “who would be better able to to gain his consent than you yourself?”

“No, by Zeus,” said he, “not I; I do not know what sort of fellow I have become; for I cannot speak to my grandfather or even look up at him any more, as I used to do. And if I keep on at this rate,” said he, “I fear I shall become a mere dolt and ninny. But when I was a little fellow, I was thought ready enough to chatter.”

“That's bad news you're giving us,” answered the boys, “if you are not going to be able to act for us in case of need, and we shall have to ask somebody else to do your part.”

1 The boys lay schemes to go hunting

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hide References (14 total)
  • Commentary references to this page (5):
    • Sir Richard C. Jebb, Commentary on Sophocles: Oedipus Tyrannus, 1-150
    • Sir Richard C. Jebb, Commentary on Sophocles: Oedipus at Colonus, 44
    • Sir Richard C. Jebb, Commentary on Sophocles: Antigone, 11
    • Sir Richard C. Jebb, Commentary on Sophocles: Antigone, 889
    • Sir Richard C. Jebb, Commentary on Sophocles: Ajax, 121
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