Since feeling and voluntary motion are peculiar to animals, whilst growth and nutrition are common to plants as well, we may look on the former as effects1of the soul2 and the latter as effects of the nature3. And if there be anyone who allows a share in soul to plants as well, and separates the two kinds of soul, naming the kind in question vegetative, and the other sensory, this person is not saying anything else, although his language is somewhat unusual. We, however, for our part, are convinced that the chief merit of language is clearness, and we know that nothing detracts so much from this as do unfamiliar terms; accordingly we employ those terms which the bulk of people are accustomed to use, and we say that animals are governed at once by their soul and by their nature, and plants by their nature alone, and that growth and nutrition are the effects of nature, not of soul. [p. 5]

1 Ergon, here rendered an effect, is literally a work or deed; strictly speaking, it is something done, completed, as distinguished from energia, which is the actualdoing, the activity which produces this ergon. cf. p. 13., and Introduction,

2 Gk. psyche, Lat. anima

3 Gk. physis, Lat. natura

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