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[67a]

Protarchus
Yes, that is what you said.

Socrates
And next it was most sufficiently proved that each of these two was insufficient.

Protarchus
Very true.

Socrates
In this argument, then, both mind and pleasure were set aside; neither of them is the absolute good, since they are devoid of self-sufficiency, adequacy, and perfection?

Protarchus
Quite right.

Socrates
And on the appearance of a third competitor, better than either of these, mind is now found to be ten thousand times more akin than pleasure to the victor.

Protarchus
Certainly.

Socrates
Then, according to the judgement which has now been given by our discussion, the power of pleasure would be fifth.

Protarchus
So it seems.


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