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[365a] “Zeus-born son of Laertes, wily Odysseus, I must speak out the word without refraining, as I shall act and think will be accomplished [and pray do not mutter in discord sitting here beside me]. For hateful to me as the gates of Hades
” [365b] “is he who hides one thing in his heart and says another. But I shall speak that which shall be accomplished.” Hom. Il. 308 ff.In these lines he makes plain the character of each of the men, that Achilles is true and simple, and Odysseus wily and false for he represents Achilles as saying these lines to Odysseus.

Socrates
Now at last, Hippias, I think I understand what you mean; you mean that the wily man is false, apparently. [365c]

Hippias
Certainly, Socrates; for Homer represents Odysseus as that sort of a man in many passages of both Iliad and Odyssey.

Socrates
Homer, then, as it seems, thought that a true man was one man and a false man another, but not the same.

Hippias
Of course he did, Socrates.

Socrates
And do you think so yourself, Hippias?

Hippias
Most assuredly; for it would be strange if I did not.

Socrates
Then let us drop Homer, [365d] since it is impossible to ask him what he meant when he made those verses; but since you come forward to take up his cause, and agree in this which you say is his meaning, do you answer for Homer and yourself in common.

Hippias
Very well; ask briefly whatever you like.

Socrates
Do you say that the false are, like the sick, without power to do anything, or that they have power to do something?

Hippias
I say that they have great power to do many things, and especially to deceive people. [365e]

Socrates
They are, then, powerful, according to you, and wily, are they not?

Hippias
Yes.

Socrates
But are they wily and deceivers by reason of simplicity and folly, or by reason of shrewdness and a sort of intelligence?

Hippias
By shrewdness, most assuredly, and intelligence.

Socrates
They are intelligent, then, as it seems.

Hippias
Yes, by Zeus, too much so.

Socrates
And being intelligent, do they know what they are doing, or do they not know?

Hippias
Yes, they know very well; that is why they do harm.

Socrates
And knowing these things which they know, are they ignorant, or wise?


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