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[389a] by laughter we must accept it, much less if gods.” “Much indeed,” he replied. “Then we must not accept from Homer such sayings as these either about the gods:“ Quenchless then was the laughter1 that rose from the blessed immortals
When they beheld Hephaestus officiously puffing and panting.
Hom. Il. 1.599-600—we must not accept it on your view.” “If it pleases you

1 It is a commonplace that the primitive sense of humor of the Homeric gods laughs at the personal deformity of Hephaestus, but they really laugh at his officiousness and the contrast he presents to Hebe. Cf. my note in Class. Phil. xxii. (1927) pp. 222-223.

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