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[22c] And this is the cause thereof: There have been and there will be many and divers destructions of mankind,1 of which the greatest are by fire and water, and lesser ones by countless other means. For in truth the story that is told in your country as well as ours, how once upon a time Phaethon, son of Helios,2 yoked his father's chariot, and, because he was unable to drive it along the course taken by his father, burnt up all that was upon the earth and himself perished by a thunderbolt,—that story, as it is told, has the fashion of a legend, but the truth of it lies in


1 Cf. Laws676 ff.

2 For the legend pf Phaethon see Ovid,Met. i. 751 ff.

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    • James Adam, The Republic of Plato, 7.530B
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