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[47b] than which no greater boon ever has come or will come, by divine bestowal, unto the race of mortals.1 This I affirm to be the greatest good of eyesight. As for all the lesser goods, why should we celebrate them? He that is no philosopher when deprived of the sight thereof may utter vain lamentations!2 But the cause and purpose of that best good, as we must maintain, is this,—that God devised and bestowed upon us vision to the end that we might behold the revolutions of Reason in the Heaven and use them for the revolvings of the reasoning that is within us, these being akin to those,


1 Cf. Phileb. 16 C ff.

2 An echo of Eurip.Phoenissae1762 ἀλλὰ γὰρ τί ταῦτα θρηνῶ καὶ μάτην ὀδύρομαι;

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  • Commentary references to this page (3):
    • James Adam, The Republic of Plato, 6.500C
    • James Adam, The Republic of Plato, 7.530D
    • James Adam, The Republic of Plato, 9.592B
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