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[90c] must necessarily and inevitably think thoughts that are immortal and divine, if so be that he lays hold on truth, and in so far as it is possible for human nature to partake of immortality,1 he must fall short thereof in no degree; and inasmuch as he is for ever tending his divine part and duly magnifying that daemon who dwells along with him, he must be supremely blessed.2 And the way of tendance of every part by every man is one—namely, to supply each with its own congenial food and motion; and for the divine part within us the congenial motions


1 Cf. Sympos. 212 A.

2 Literally, “with a good daemon” (a play on δαίμωνand εὐδαίμων).

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    • James Adam, The Republic of Plato, 10.616B
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