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[941b] if convicted. Theft of property is uncivilized, open robbery is shameless: neither of these has any of the sons of Zeus practiced, through delight in fraud or force. Let no man, therefore, be deluded concerning this or persuaded either by poets or by any perverse myth-mongers into the belief that, when he thieves or forcibly robs, he is doing nothing shameful, but just what the gods themselves do.1 That is both unlikely and untrue; and whoever acts thus unlawfully is neither a god at all nor a child of gods;

1 Cp.Plat. Rep 378 ff., Plat. Rep. 388 ff. Hermes is specially in mind, as notorious for his thefts and frauds; cp. Homer Iliad 5. 390; 24. 395, etc.

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  • Cross-references in notes from this page (2):
    • Plato, Republic, 388
    • Plato, Republic, 378a
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