previous next

Power
Now rivet this one too and securely, so that he may learn, for all his cleverness, that he is a fool compared to Zeus.

Hephaestus
None but he could justly blame my work.

Power
Now drive the adamantine wedge's stubborn edge straight [65] through his chest with your full force.

Hephaestus
Alas, Prometheus, I groan for your sufferings.

Power
What! Shrinking again and groaning over the enemies of Zeus? Take care, so that the day does not come when you shall grieve for yourself.

Hephaestus
You see a spectacle grievous for eyes to behold.

Power
[70] I see this man getting his deserts. Come, cast the girths about his sides.

Hephaestus
I must do this; spare me your needless ordering.

Power
Indeed, I'll order you, yes and more—I'll hound you on. Get down below, and ring his legs by force.

Hephaestus
[75] There now! The work's done and without much labor.

Power
Now hammer the piercing fetters with your full force; for the appraiser of our work is severe.

Hephaestus
The utterance of your tongue matches your looks.

Power
Be softhearted then, [80] but do not attack my stubborn will and my harsh mood.

Hephaestus
Let us be gone, since he has got the fetters on his limbs.Exit

Power
There now, indulge your insolence, keep on wresting from the gods their honors to give them to creatures of a day. Are mortals able to lighten your load of sorrow? [85] Falsely the gods call you Prometheus,1for you yourself need forethought to free yourself from this handiwork.Exeunt Power and Force

1 Such etymologizing “play” (Pro-metheus, Fore-thought) was a serious matter to the Greeks, who found in the name of a person a significant indication of his nature or his fate. Unlike Shakespeare, Aeschylus saw nothing even half-humorous in such etymological analysis; and elsewhere, in playing on the names Apollo, Clytaemestra, Polynices, the nomen is an omen.

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 United States License.

An XML version of this text is available for download, with the additional restriction that you offer Perseus any modifications you make. Perseus provides credit for all accepted changes, storing new additions in a versioning system.

load focus Greek (Herbert Weir Smyth, Ph.D., 1926)
hide Places (automatically extracted)

View a map of the most frequently mentioned places in this document.

Visualize the most frequently mentioned Pleiades ancient places in this text.

Download Pleiades ancient places geospacial dataset for this text.

hide References (2 total)
hide Display Preferences
Greek Display:
Arabic Display:
View by Default:
Browse Bar: