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[13] Further, the nearness of the terrible makes men pity.1 Men also pity those who resemble them in age, character, habits, position, or family; for all such relations make a man more likely to think that their misfortune may befall him as well. For, in general, here also we may conclude that all that men fear in regard to themselves excites their pity when others are the victims.

1 Jebb renders: “Again men pity when the danger is near themselves,” which may mean when they see something terrible happening to others and likely soon to befall themselves. Vahlen inserts οὐ γὰρ before ἔτι: “for men cease to pity when the terrible comes close to themselves.

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