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[14] Proverbs also are metaphors from species to species. If a man, for instance, introduces into his house something from which he expects to benefit, but afterwards finds himself injured instead, it is as the Carpathian1 says of the hare; for both have
experienced the same misfortunes. This is nearly all that can be said of the sources of smart sayings and the reasons which make them so.

1 Or, “he says it is a case of the Carpathian and the hare.” An inhabitant of the island of Carpathus introduced a brace of hares, which so multiplied that they devoured all the crops and ruined the farmers (like the rabbits in Australia).

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load focus Notes (E. M. Cope, 1877)
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