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[50]

But I have already discussed these matters.1 I must now add that Homer speaks of a Pedasus, a city of the Leleges, as subject to lord Altes:“Of Altes, who is lord over the war-loving Leleges, who hold steep Pedasus on the Satnioeis.
2And the site of the place, now deserted, is still to be seen. Some write, though wrongly, "at the foot of Satnioeis,"3 as though the city lay at the foot of a mountain called Satnioeis; but there is no mountain here called Satinoeis, but only a river of that name, on which the city is situated; but the city is now deserted. The poet names the river, for, according to him, “he wounded Satnius with a thrust of his spear, even the son of Oenops, whom a peerless Naiad nymph bore unto Oenops, as he tended his herds by the banks of the Satnioeis;
4and again:“And he dwelt by the banks of the fair-flowing Satnioeis in steep Pedasus.
5And in later times it was called Satnioeis, though some called it Saphnioeis. It is only a large winter torrent, but the naming of it by the poet has made it worthy of mention. These places are continuous with Dardania and Scepsia, and are, as it were, a second Dardania, but it is lower-lying.

1 13. 1. 7.

2 Hom. Il. 21.86

3 i.e., ὑπό for ἐπί in the Homeric passage quoted.

4 Hom. Il. 14.443

5 Hom. Il. 6.34

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load focus English (H.C. Hamilton, Esq., W. Falconer, M.A., 1903)
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